ENTRIES TAGGED "Twitter"

pushState to the future: progressive enhancement using HTML5 pushState at Twitter

Fluent is O’Reilly’s conference dedicated to the Web Platform and all that entails, with a focus on JavaScript and HTML5. In 2013, over 1000 attendees and speakers like Brendan Eich, the creator of JavaScript and CTO of Mozilla, Paul Irish of Google, and CSS guru Lea Verou came together to learn, share, and network.

One speaker at Fluent 2013 whose talk was particularly well received was Todd Kloots of Twitter who spoke about HTML5′s pushState API and demonstrated how it was used in Twitter’s Web-based interface.

Some key parts of Todd’s talk include:

  • The opportunity Twitter saw in pushState [at 01:45]
  • What you had to do with dynamic URLs before pushState [at 02:46]
  • A summary of the pushState API [at 06:10]
  • Gotchas and browser support [at 07:58]
  • How pushState sped up navigation on Twitter.com without re-architecting [at 12:15]
  • What Twitter had to do server-side to make progressive enhancement work [at 19:11]
  • Final thoughts [at 31:37]
  • Q&A [at 32:15]

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Twitter’s Most Fundamental Value

Twitter could be so much better than an advertising company

We can now gather from Twitter’s IPO that it’s fundamentally postured as an advertising company, but its real value isn’t in advertising. Twitter’s most fundamental value rests squarely within data analytics. However, just because Twitter could make a lot of money in advertising doesn’t mean that advertising is where it should concentrate the majority of your efforts or where its most fundamental value proposition lies.

More specifically, Twitter’s most fundamental value is in the overall collective intelligence of its user base when interpreted as an interest graph. Think of an interest graph as a mapping of people to their interests. In other words, if you follow an account on Twitter, what you’re really saying is that you’re interested in that account. Even though there’s lots to be gleaned in all of the little 140 character quips associated with a particular account, there’s a good bit you can tell about a person by solely examining the accounts that the person follows.

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Investigating the Twitter Interest Graph

Why Is Twitter All the Rage?

I’m presenting a short webcast entitled Why Twitter Is All the Rage: A Data Miner’s Perspective that is loosely adapted from material that appears early in Mining the Social Web (2nd Ed). I wanted to share out the content that inspired the topic. The remainder of this post is a slightly abridged reproduction of a section that appears early in Chapter 1. If you enjoy it, you can download all of Chapter 1 as a free PDF to learn more about mining Twitter data.
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Writing Paranoid Code

Computing Twitter Influence, Part 2

In the previous post of this series, we aspired to compute the influence of a Twitter account and explored some relevant variables to arriving at a base metric. This post continues the conversation by presenting some sample code for making “reliable” requests to Twitter’s API to facilitate the data collection process.

Given a Twitter screen name, it’s (theoretically) quite simple to get all of the account profiles that follow the screen name. Perhaps the most economical route is to use the GET /followers/ids API to request all of the follower IDs in batches of 5,000 per response, followed by the GET /users/lookup API to retrieve full account profiles for up to Y of those IDs in batches of 100 per response. Thus, if an account has X followers, you’d need to anticipate making ceiling(X/5000) API calls to GET /followers/ids and ceiling(X/100) API calls toGET /users/lookup. Although most Twitter accounts may not have enough followers that the total number of requests to each API resource presents rate-limiting problems, you can rest assured that the most popular accounts will trigger rate-limiting enforcements that manifest as an HTTP error in RESTful APIs.

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Computing Twitter Influence, Part 1: Arriving at a Base Metric

The subtle variables affecting a base metric

This post introduces a series that explores the problem of approximating a Twitter account’s influence. With the ubiquity of social media and its effects on everything from how we shop to how we vote at the polls, it’s critical that we be able to employ reasonably accurate and well-understood measurements for approximating influence from social media signals.

Unlike social networks such as LinkedIn and Facebook in which connections between entities are symmetric and typically correspond to a real world connection, Twitter’s underlying data model is fundamentally predicated upon asymmetric following relationships. Another way of thinking about a following relationship is to consider that it’s little more than a subscription to a feed about some content of interest. In other words, when you follow another Twitter user, you are expressing interest in that other user and are opting-in to whatever content it would like to place in your home timeline. As such, Twitter’s underlying network structure can be interpreted as an interest graph and mined for insights about the relative popularity of one user when compared to another.
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Commerce Weekly: You can now buy stuff with tweets

AmEx now lets you buy with hashtags, 3D printing threats to retail, and PayPal comes to the gas pump.

American Express turns Twitter into an ecommerce platform

American Express announced an enhancement this week to its Sync with Twitter feature — users can now buy things with a tweet. Tricia Duryee reports at All Things Digital that all users will need to register to participate, even previous users of the sync feature, in order to provide a delivery address for purchased items. Once registration is complete, Duryee says, the purchasing process is pretty straightforward:

“For instance, participants will be able to buy a $25 American Express Gift Card for $15 … by tweeting #BuyAmexGiftCard25. American Express will reply via Twitter, asking the user to confirm the purchase in a tweet. All products will be shipped via free two-day shipping.”

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Commerce Weekly: PayPal’s Here service takes on Square

Commerce Weekly: PayPal’s Here service takes on Square

PayPal launches a card reader, AmEx teams with Twitter, and the smartphone tipping point is mere months away.

PayPal introduces its own credit card reader, AmEx asks you to tweet it out, and Asymco visualizes the smartphone market. (Commerce Weekly is produced as part of a partnership between O'Reilly and PayPal.)

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Developer Week in Review

Developer Week in Review

iPhone gets cracked, Twitter gets picky, and Internet connectivity gets disrupted.

In the latest Developer Week in Review: the iPhone fell to attackers, Twitter shunned their developers, and the Internet proved not to be as robust as one might hope.

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John Adams on Fixing Twitter: Improving the Performance and Scalability of the World’s Most Popular Micro-blogging Site

Twitter is suffering outages today as they fend off a Denial of Service attack, and so I thought it would be helpful to post John Adams’ exceptional Velocity session about Operations at Twitter. Good luck today John & team… I know it’s going to be a long day! Update: Apparently Facebook & Livejournal have had similar attacks today. Rich Miller…

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