ENTRIES TAGGED "patents"

Update Mobility: The Year in Mobile

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

As the end of December approaches, it’s time to take a look at the year that was. In a lot of ways, 2013 was a status quo year for mobile, with nothing earthshaking to report, just a steady progression of what already is getting more, um, is-y?

We started the year with Apple on top in the tablet space, Android on top in the handset space, and that’s how we ended the year. Microsoft appears to have abandoned the handset space after a decade of attempts to take market-share, and made their move on the tablet space instead with the Surface. In spite of expensive choreographer board room commercials, the Surface didn’t make a huge dent in Apple’s iPad dominance. But Microsoft did better than Blackberry, whose frantic flailing in the market has come to represent nothing so much as a fish out of water.

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Peer to Peer Reaching the Browser through WebRTC

Will WebRTC disrupt or be disrupted?

WebRTC promises to deliver computer to computer communications with minimal reliance on central servers to manage the conversation. Peer-to-peer systems promise smoother exchanges without the tremendous scale challenges of running video, for example, through central points.

The WebRTC Conference and Expo was unlike any other web conference I’ve attended. Though technologies in development are common at tech conferences, I can’t remember attending a show that was focused on a technology whose future had these levels of promise and uncertainty. Also, despite the name, WebRTC doesn’t resemble much of the Web despite being built into some browsers (more hopefully coming soon) and supporting HTTP(S) proxying.

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Upward Mobility: Microsoft’s Patent Arsenal Is Full of Blanks

Why innovate in the product space, when you can leech money instead?

It is with some amusement that your humble servant read this week of Microsoft’s lucrative business licensing their patents to Android handset makers. How lucrative? Evidently, over two billion dollars a year, five times their revenue from actual mobile products that the company produces. What is harder to discover, unless you do a lot of digging, is what the Android vendors are actually licensing. You have to dig back into the original suit between Microsoft and Motorola to find a list of patents, although they may have added to their portfolio since then through further acquisitions. The thing is that, unlike many parts of the software industry, the cellular portion actually has some valid patents lurking around. Cell phones have radios in them, and there are continual improvements in the protocols and technologies used to make data move faster. As a result, it is a perfectly reasonable assumption to make that Microsoft has acquired some of these cellular patents, and is using them as a revenue stream. Unfortunately, a look at the Motorola suit patent list tells a different story. Read more…

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Developer Week in Review: The new iPad and the big meh

Developer Week in Review: The new iPad and the big meh

It's iPad evolution rather than revolution, increasing patent penalties for Android, and Raspberry Pi is served.

Apple unveils pretty much what it was expected to unveil, and decides to treat Android as a cash cow rather than an enemy. Meanwhile, the Raspberry Pi is finally out, so let the hacking begin.

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Developer Week in Review: A pause to consider patents

Developer Week in Review: A pause to consider patents

There was good news and bad news on the intellectual property front this week.

We take a look at two major events that rocked the technology intellectual property wars, centered on a courtroom in Texas and a standards body a continent away.

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Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0

Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0

The Linux kernel gets to 3.0, Oracle is bitten by the Internet's long memory, and more lawsuit fever.

The Linux kernel gets to version 3.0. Meanwhile, Oracle doesn't seem to remember the warm reception that Sun gave Android, and big players get lawsuits on their doorsteps.

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Developer Week in Review: Mobile’s embedded irony

Developer Week in Review: Mobile’s embedded irony

Who really profits from Android sales? And does the world need another source control system?

Microsoft profits from Google's toils, why you shouldn't put older developers out to pasture, and a new source control system enters the fray.

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Developer Week in Review: Christmas in July for Apache

Developer Week in Review: Christmas in July for Apache

Apache adds to their donated portfolio and your travel-patent guide to East Texas.

In the latest Developer Week in Review: Apache gets a gift of code from IBM, and a handy patent / travel guide for your next trip to East Texas.

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Developer Week in Review: Start your lawyers!

Developer Week in Review: Start your lawyers!

If the lawsuit fits, the Kinect SDK for Windows arrives, and IPv6 day fails to excite.

The legal community continued to feed off IP disputes among software giants, Microsoft brings the Kinect SDK to Windows, and the web switches IPv6 on for a day, but did anyone notice?

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Developer Week in Review: The other shoe drops on iOS developers

Developer Week in Review: The other shoe drops on iOS developers

iPhone devs may need lawyers, Apache gets a new project, and Java programmers abuse a pattern

If you were an iOS developer, you may have gotten to meet a process server in person this week, as Lodsys doles out the first batch of lawsuits. Oracle gave Apache the keys to OpenOffice, and told them to take it out for a spin, and your faithful editor vents about a commonly overused Java pattern.

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