ENTRIES TAGGED "wal-mart"

Commerce Weekly: Wal-Mart looks outside the (big) box to battle Amazon

Wal-Mart and Google pursue speedy delivery. Elsewhere, more reasons for retailers to fear smartphones, and mobile may be eBay's best bet.

Wal-Mart wants to crowdsource delivery, while Google chases same-day

On the heels of launching its in-store delivery locker program to compete with Amazon Locker, Wal-Mart has announced it’s toying with the idea of having in-store customers deliver online orders to speed delivery times. Reporting on the news at Reuters, Alistair Barr and Jessica Wohl note that, in essence, Wal-Mart would be experimenting with the growing crowdsourcing trend that works well in so many other areas, so why not for Wal-Mart delivery? They write:

“A plethora of start-ups now help people make money by renting out a spare room, a car, or even a cocktail dress, and Wal-Mart would in effect be inviting people to rent out space in their vehicle and their willingness to deliver packages to others.”

Barr and Wohl mention a few of the “why nots” — numerous legal, regulatory and privacy obstacles — but report that Joel Anderson, chief executive of Walmart.com, believes it to be a viable plan. “This is at the brain-storming stage,” he says, “but it’s possible in a year or two.”

At Bloomberg’s Businessweek, Susan Berfield points to the bigger picture: “Even if the idea never moves past the hypothetical, the fact that Anderson is even talking about it signals how serious a threat Walmart considers Amazon.” Wired’s Laura Heller agrees, noting that though there are “far too many unattractive variables” for this program to become a reality, “it shows the retailer is thinking outside of the box when it comes to competing with its online competition, Amazon.”

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Commerce Weekly: Same-day delivery war heats up

The same-day delivery battle, NFC in vending machines, and Google as information central for holiday shoppers.

Here are a few stories that caught my attention in the commerce space this week.

The high price of instant gratification

The Wall Street Journal’s Greg Bensinger took a look this week at the e-commerce same-day delivery trend, a service eBay, Wal-Mart and Google have been experimenting with in order to better compete with Amazon, which has offered same-day service in select locations since 2009.

The obvious benefit for e-commerce retailers is being able to improve the customer experience — providing the convenience of online shopping with the instant gratification of brick-and-mortar shopping. The biggest obstacle is cost. EBay, for example, has hired couriers, paying $12.50 per hour and 55 cents per mile, Bensinger reports, but only charges $5 to deliver a minimum $25 order. Industry analyst Kerry Rice told Bensinger, “Retailers are clearly subsidizing this service to improve the customer experience. Amazon created this monster and everyone has had to jump on board to compete.”

Amazon operating at a loss to draw consumers into its ecosystem is pretty par for its business model, and its deep pockets mean companies are going to have to get creative to successfully compete. Wal-Mart is perhaps in the best position not only to compete with Amazon on this front, but perhaps even overtake and lead the same-day delivery field. Walmart.com chief executive Joel Anderson highlighted for Bensinger Wal-Mart’s advantage: “We have 4,000 Wal-Mart stores and local goods within five miles of most customers.” Each store basically serves as an online distribution center, a scale that Amazon could be challenged to meet, even taking into account its aggressive distribution center expansion plans.

In related news, Google reportedly shelled out more than $17 million to buy Canadian locker storage startup BufferBox this week. As many outlets reported, Google may be positioning itself to compete against Amazon’s Locker delivery service, which allows customers to have goods delivered to secure pick-up stations rather than home addresses.

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Commerce Weekly: Mainstream mobile payment a decade out?

Don't toss out your leather wallet just yet, Wal-Mart is innovating, and Project Oscar is a go.

Here are a few stories that caught my attention this week in the commerce space.

Gimmick to mainstream — the difference a decade can make

With Square teaming up with Starbucks, PayPal partnering with major chains like Home Depot and McDonald’s, and all the hype and speculation around the new iPhone having or not having NFC to facilitate payments for Passbook, mobile payments are getting a lot of ink. But when will mobile payments be fully mainstream? Not for at least 10 years, writes Christina Bonnington this week at Wired. Bonnington points to slow adoption and infrastructure holdups as the major bottlenecks:

“Forrester Research estimates only one-fourth of U.S. consumers will own an NFC-enabled phone by 2016, with 100 million shipping in 2012. Until a solid majority of consumers own such devices, merchants have little incentive to create an infrastructure as receptive to smartphone payments as it is to cash and credit cards.”

Bonnington notes that credit card companies are pushing for merchants to upgrade their systems to accept contactless payments, but as analyst Mark Hung told her, this alone could take up to a decade. Bonnington points out that even after that happens, mainstream mobile payments will still face obstacles similar to those that credit card payments face now: competing platforms that force consumers to carry multiple credit cards to accommodate merchants who accept MasterCard and Visa but not Discover, for instance. Imagine a merchant accepting PayPal and whatever Apple develops but not Google Wallet or Isis. Adding to the chaos, processing fee distribution between banks and hardware/software developers will need to be sorted out, she says, as will agreements on how data gathered via mobile payment will be handled.

In a similar vein, Chris Ziegler at The Verge also argued this week that mobile payments are not ripe for the mainstream and pointed to the ultimate hurdle: consumer frustration and distrust. Ziegler shares a personal experience that highlights the cumulative result of the issues Bonnington noted together with the unreliability of cellular networks: even mobile payments in stores that are set up to accept them don’t always work. Until mobile payments become as reliable and ubiquitous as cash and credit cards, he argues, they’ll remain a gimmick.

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