ENTRIES TAGGED "unix"

Transformative Programming

Flow-based, functional, and more

“Small pieces loosely joined,” David Weinberger’s appealing theory of the Web, has much to say to programmers as well. It always inspires me to reduce the size of individual code components. The hard part, though, is rarely the “small” – it’s the “loose”.

After years of watching and wondering, I’m starting to see a critical mass of developers working within approaches that value loose connections. The similarities may not be obvious (or even necessarily welcome) to practitioners, but they share an approach of applying encapsulation to transformations, rather than data. Of course, as all of these are older technologies, the opportunity has been there for a long time.

The Return of Flow-Based Programming

No Flo and its successful Kickstarter to create a unique visual environment for JavaScript programming reawakened broader interest in flow-based programming. FBP goes back to the 1970s, and breaks development into two categories:

“There’s two roles: There’s the person building componentry, who has to have experience in a particular program area, and there’s the person who puts them together,” explains Morrison. “And it’s two different skills.”

That separation of skills – programmers creating separate black box transformations and less-programmery people defining how to fit the transformations together – created a social problem for the approach. (I still hear similar complaints about the designer/programmer roles for web development.)

The map-like pictures that are drawing people to NoFlo, like this one for NoFlo Jekyll, show how the transformations connect, how the inputs and outputs are linked. I like the pictures, I’m not terribly worried that they will descend into mad spaghetti, and this division of labor makes too much sense to me. At the same time, though, it reminds me of a few other things.

graphic representation of flow through Jekyll

NoFlo diagram for noflo-jekyll

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Developer Week in Review: Two giants fall

Developer Week in Review: Two giants fall

Steve Jobs and the App Store, goodbye to Dennis Ritchie, and an internal Google critique goes public.

Better late than never, a few thoughts on Steve Jobs. Also, a Unix pioneer leaves us, and Google's dirty laundry is accidentally hung out to dry.

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Developer Week in Review

Developer Week in Review

Unix IP on the block, AT&T can't keep a secret, and take one tablet and call me in the morning

This week, Unix was for sale, then it wasn't, then it was again. AT&T announced the most poorly kept secret in the history of secrets. And the tablet was all the rage at CES.

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