ENTRIES TAGGED "payment"

Commerce Weekly: Bring your mobile to Black Friday

Commerce Weekly: Bring your mobile to Black Friday

Retailers accept mobile's in-store presence, Android developers are keen on Kindle Fire, and Square rewards loyalty.

Brick-and-mortar retailers adopt the "if you can't beat 'em …" attitude toward mobile devices. Elsewhere, Android developers are intrigued by the Kindle Fire, and Square wants to put loyalty program punch cards out to pasture. (Commerce Weekly is produced as part of a partnership between O'Reilly and PayPal.)

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ePayments Week: Three startups bet on commerce

ePayments Week: Three startups bet on commerce

Three commerce startups from TechCrunch Disrupt. Also, daily deals and the feature phone endure.

Three commerce startups from TechCrunch Disrupt feature alternative forms of payment for digital goods. Also, daily deals and the feature phone endure.

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ePayments Week: Customers still wary of mobile payments

ePayments Week: Customers still wary of mobile payments

Mobile payment companies have an adoption issue, and a new batch of iPhone 5 payment rumors.

Consumer Reports says only 5% use mobile payments, and they better be darned careful about how they do. Also, an infographic shows the uptake in mobile banking, and we've got new reports from the rumor mill about Apple tapping PayPal for iPhone 5.

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ePayments Week: Is iTunes the fifth most populous country?

ePayments Week: Is iTunes the fifth most populous country?

Apple has 200 million accounts, Hearst challenges the Post Office, and credit cards have life.

In his iPad 2 presentation, Steve Jobs says Apple has more credit card accounts than anywhere else on the Internet. Also, Hearst Media has a plan to bring advertising into personal financial management, and some say the days of credit cards are drawing to a close (credit card companies beg to differ).

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Open source cuts microlending complexity

Open source cuts microlending complexity

The Mifos Initiative is using open source software to serve the developing world.

Creating financial software for the developing world is tricky business. Variations between countries — and between the banks within those countries — make proprietary solutions unsustainable without massive investment. The Mifos Initiative has gone a different route: manage an open source project that lets banks customize software to meet their unique microlending needs.

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