ENTRIES TAGGED "literate"

Documentation as Testing

Can explanation contribute to technology creation?

“If you’re explaining, you’re losing.”

That gem of political wisdom has always been hard for me to take, as, after all, I make my living at explaining technology. I don’t feel like I’m losing. And yet…

It rings true. It’s not that programs and devices shouldn’t need documentation, but rather that documentation is an opportunity to find out just how complex a tool is. The problem is less that documentation writers are losing when they’re explaining, and more that creators of software and devices are losing when they have to settle for “fix in documentation.”

I was delighted last week to hear from Doug Schepers of webplatform.org that they want to “tighten the feedback loop between specification and documentation to make the specifications better.” Documentation means that someone has read and attempted to explain the specification to a broader audience, and the broader audience can then try things out and add their own comments. Writing documentation with that as an explicit goal is a much happier approach than the usual perils of documentation writers, trapped explaining unfixable tools whose creators apparently never gave much thought to explaining them.

It’s not just WebPlatform.org. I’ve praised the Elixir community for similar willingness to listen when people writing documentation (internal or external) report difficulties. When something is hard to explain, there’s usually some elegance missing. Developers writing their own documentation sometimes find it, but it can be easier to see the seams when you aren’t the one creating them.
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Applying markup to complexity

The blurry line between markup and programming.

When XML exploded onto the scene, it ignited visions of magical communications, simplified document storage, and a whole new wave of application capabilities. Reality has proved calmer, with competition from JSON and other formats tackling a wide variety of problems, while the biggest of the big data problems have such volume that adding markup seems likely to create new problems.

However, at the in-progress Balisage conference, it’s clear that markup remains really good at solving a middle category of problems, where its richer structures can shine without creating headaches of volume or complication. In the past, Balisage often focused on hard problems most people didn’t yet have, but this year’s program tackles challenges that more developers are encountering as their projects grow in complexity.

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