ENTRIES TAGGED "history"

pushState to the future: progressive enhancement using HTML5 pushState at Twitter

Fluent is O’Reilly’s conference dedicated to the Web Platform and all that entails, with a focus on JavaScript and HTML5. In 2013, over 1000 attendees and speakers like Brendan Eich, the creator of JavaScript and CTO of Mozilla, Paul Irish of Google, and CSS guru Lea Verou came together to learn, share, and network.

One speaker at Fluent 2013 whose talk was particularly well received was Todd Kloots of Twitter who spoke about HTML5′s pushState API and demonstrated how it was used in Twitter’s Web-based interface.

Some key parts of Todd’s talk include:

  • The opportunity Twitter saw in pushState [at 01:45]
  • What you had to do with dynamic URLs before pushState [at 02:46]
  • A summary of the pushState API [at 06:10]
  • Gotchas and browser support [at 07:58]
  • How pushState sped up navigation on Twitter.com without re-architecting [at 12:15]
  • What Twitter had to do server-side to make progressive enhancement work [at 19:11]
  • Final thoughts [at 31:37]
  • Q&A [at 32:15]

Read more…

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Four short links: 13 August 2009

Four short links: 13 August 2009

  1. Under the Hood of App Inventor for Android — regular readers know I’m a big fan of visual programming language Scratch, and apparently Google are too. They’ve got twelve university classes testing App Inventor for Android, a visual connect-the-bits programming environment for Android. University classes probably because one of the co-creators is Hal Abelson, coauthor of the definitive programming textbook. Also found online: the PR-type announcement, a Professor using it, and @AppInv (nothing juicy on Twitter–it looks like might be a channel for tech support for the students). (via Hacker News)
  2. Google Web Optimizer Case Study (Four Hour Work Week) — GWO manages A/B tests for you, with a lot of statistical analysis. It’s a fascinating read to see how these should be done. Every equation may halve the readership of a book, but every table of numbers and relevancy analysis doubles the value of a post like this. (via Hacker News)
  3. Opening Up The BBC’s Natural History Archive — the BBC are releasing programme segments and a whole lot of metadata around their programming. Audio and video segmented, tagged with DBpedia terms, and aggregated into a URI structure based on natural history concepts: species, habitats, adaptations, etc. Gorgeous!
  4. Yahoo! Term Extraction API to CloseInternally, both services
    share a backend data source that is closing down, so the publicly-facing YDN
    services will be closing as well.
    I think it’s the most significant casualty of Y! outsourcing search to MSFT, as this API was used by a lot of projects. (via Simon Willison)
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