ENTRIES TAGGED "design"

Knowing and Understanding Your Audience

Measuring impact and changing behavior

I had the opportunity to sit down with Laura Klein (@lauraklein) and talk about the importance of creating effective user experiences. Laura is a UX expert and consultant. She stresses the need to figure out what works by talking to users and determining what works through usability testing. She’s also author of O’Reilly Media’s UX for Lean Startups: Faster, Smarter User Experience Research and Design. It hit home when Laura told me, “If people aren’t getting it, you’re probably doing it wrong.”

Key highlights include:

  • How to figure out what works, so you can avoid a poor user experience. [Discussed at 0:19]
  • It’s important to avoid porting a traditional process to a new product and service. Instead you need to think about how to design a new and natural experience. [Discussed at 2:16]
  • Think about context when designing new processes. [Discussed at 2:37]
  • The first step in creating a successful UX is knowing and understanding your audience. [Discussed at 3:49]
  • Using these principles beyond web sites. In all good UX applications, the goal is not to notice the interface. [Discussed at 5:16]
  • It’s critical to observe people, so you’re not assuming a knowledge base. [Discussed at 7:35]
  • The importance of A/B Testing. And how design is not an art; it’s trying to solve a problem. [Discussed at 9:54]
  • How the build, measure, learn lean methodology fits with UX design. It’s all about measuring the impact and changing behavior. [Discussed at 11:11]
  • You can view the full interview here:

    Related:

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Human-Centered Design May Be What Makes Your App Stand Out

OSCON 2013 Speaker Series

Tony Santos, (@tsmuse) is a User Experience Lead at Mozilla and OSCON 2013 Speaker. We talk about Human-Centered Design and how it can make all the difference.

NOTE: If you are interested in attending OSCON to check out Tony’s talk or the many other cool sessions, click over to the OSCON website where you can use the discount code OS13PROG to get 20% your registration fee.

Key highlights include:

  • Defining human-centered design. [Discussed at 0:20]
  • Hey Developers, Want your app, software, or product to be a success? Then you need to care about this, seriously. [Discussed at 1:05]
  • So, what do users actually want? [Discussed at 2:10]
  • Some (user) research is better than no (user) research. [Discussed at 3:03]
  • Open source sort of abides by human-centered design by its very nature, but can do even better. [Discussed at 4:01]
  • A human-centered design success story. [Discussed at 6:26]

You can view the full interview here:

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Laura Klein’s Six Reasons Founders Should Learn UX Design Now

The only thing harder to find than a great designer is a unicorn

I know, I know. Founders and entrepreneurs are already being told that they need to learn how to code, hire, raise money, and get customers.

Screw that. What founders and entrepreneurs should really do is learn how to build a useful product. And that means learning the fundamentals of research and design.

Don’t believe me? Here are six reasons you should be your own UX designer (or at least learn enough about UX design to fake it).

1. You need to know what problem you’re solving and for whom

GPS solved the problem of getting lost when going to new places. Kindle solved the problem of my entire house filling up with books I’d already read. Instagram and other similar tools solved the problem of how to share all those great photos on your phone with your friends.

Of course, not every product idea solves a problem, and not every problem is something that people are willing to pay you to solve. That’s why it’s so important to learn the fundamentals of customer development and user research.

If you know how to validate your product ideas, you’ll be able to more accurately predict which products solve important problems for large groups of people. This means that you’ll be more likely to build something that lots of people want to pay you for.

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Drupal for Designers

Dani Nordin on what you need to know

Dani Nordin (@danigrrl) is an O’Reilly author (Drupal for Designers) and UX designer.

We sat down recently to catch up on her current projects and her predictions for the future of Drupal design. She shared some best practices for designing, her experiences with a large-scale academic project, and what criteria goes into the Design 4 Drupal Boston event.

Highlights from the conversation include:

  • Learn the common pitfalls Drupal designers fall into, along with some tips and tricks to avoid them (hint: Drupal is like a cake recipe) [Discussed at the 0:17 mark].
  • How the Berklee College of Music is using Drupal [Discussed at the 5:49 mark].
  • The focus for 2013′s Design 4 Drupal Boston [Discussed at the 7:50 mark].
  • The ways Drupal 8 could change how designers work [Discussed at the 9:40 mark].

You can view the entire interview in the following video.

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Developer Week in Review: Sometimes, form does need to follow function

Developer Week in Review: Sometimes, form does need to follow function

Why remotes need buttons, lawmakers need a clue, and life-critical software needs many eyes.

The latest rumors have Apple eyeing the remote control market, but does minimalistic design work for remotes? Australia wants to impose requirements on ISPs, but at what infrastructure cost? And would you let closed-source software keep you alive?

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Software crumple zones

It's time to recognize and appreciate highly engineered health information systems.

Clinicians often encounter multi-step software processes that seem laborious. Sometimes that's due to a design flaw, but other times that process has been intentionally constructed as a crumple zone.

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To the end of bloated code and broken websites

Nicole Sullivan on how CSS is evolving to meet performance and device needs.

Velocity speaker and CSS expert Nicole Sullivan discusses the state of CSS — how it’s adapting to mobile, how it’s improving performance, and how some CSS best practices have led to “bloated code and broken websites.”

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