ENTRIES TAGGED "data analysis"

The Future of Monitoring Data is In the Cloud

Scale and complexity call for leaving it to specialists

As applications move from on­premise to SaaS, the scale of deployments increases by orders of magnitude (to “web­scale”). At the same time, application development and operation become tightly integrated and continuous deployment brings the frequency of updates down from months to days or even hours.

The larger scale makes the health of SaaS applications mission-critical and even existential to its providers, while the frequent updates increase the risk of failures. Therefore, monitoring and root cause analysis also become mission critical functions, and more instrumentation is needed to ensure the application’s quality of service. At the company I co-founded, we see customers using extensive and often tailored instrumentation that generates massive amounts of data (think hundreds of thousands of data streams and billions of data points per day).

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Data Science for Business

What business leaders need to know about data and data analysis to drive their businesses forward.

DataScienceForBusinessCoverA couple of years ago, Claudia Perlich introduced me to Foster Provost, her PhD adviser. Foster showed me the book he was writing with Tom Fawcett, and using in his teaching at NYU.

Foster and Tom have a long history of applying data to practical business problems. Their book, which evolved into Data Science for Business, was different from all the other data science books I’ve seen. It wasn’t about tools: Hadoop and R are scarcely mentioned, if at all. It wasn’t about coding: business students don’t need to learn how to implement machine learning algorithms in Python. It is about business: specifically, it’s about the data analytic thinking that business people need to work with data effectively.

Data analytic thinking means knowing what questions to ask, how to ask those questions, and whether the answers you get make sense. Business leaders don’t (and shouldn’t) do the data analysis themselves. But in this data-driven age, it’s critically important for business leaders to understand how to work with the data scientists on their teams. Read more…

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R as a Programming Language

Moving beyond traditional tools makes data analysis faster and more powerful

Garrett Grolemund is an O’Reilly author and teaches classes on data analysis for R Studios.

We sat down to discuss why data scientists, statisticians, and programmers alike can use the R language to make data analysis easier and more powerful.

Key points from the full video (below) interview include:

  • R is a free, open-source language that has its roots in S-PLUS [Discussed at the 0:27 mark]
  • What does it mean for R to be a programming language versus just a data analysis tool? [Discussed at the 1:00 mark]
  • R comes with many useful data analysis methods already implemented, so you don’t have to start from scratch. [Discussed at the 4:23 mark]
  • R is a mix of functional and object-oriented programming that is optimal for handling data structures that data analysts expect (e.g. vectors) [Discussed at the 6:08 mark]
  • A discussion of using R in conjunction with other languages like Python, along with packages that help with this [Discussed at the 7:30 mark]
  • Getting started using R isn’t really any harder than using a calculator [Discussed at the 9:28 mark]

You can view the entire interview in the following video.

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