Federico Lucifredi

Federico Lucifredi is the maintainer of the man suite, the primary documentation-delivery tool under Linux, a graduate of Boston College and Harvard University, and the Ubuntu Advantage Product Manager at Canonical. As a software engineer-turned-manager at the Novell corporation, Federico was part of the SUSE Linux team for five years, overseeing the update stack of a 150 million dollar maintenance business. Previously, Federico has been a CIO and a network software architect at technology and embedded Linux startups, and he has spent two years teaching in Boston University's graduate and undergraduate programs, while simultaneously consulting for MIT. He is a frequent speaker at user group and conference events, notably the Linux Foundation's LinuxCon, LinuxWorld, the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, and the IMPlanet conferences, where he was a panelist representing the Jabber community. Federico is a recognized expert in computing performance issues, and consults pro-bono with Standard and Poor's clients interested in Free/Open Source Software technical and strategic issues. He participated in the GPL v3 drafting process in the large-corporation panel.

Supercomputing on the cheap with Parallella

Blowing open the doors to low-power, on-demand supercomputing

Parallella topview

Packing impressive supercomputing power inside a small credit card-sized board running Ubuntu, Adapteva‘s $99 ARM-based Parallella system includes the unique Ephiphany numerical accelerator that promises to unleash industrial strength parallel processing on the desktop at a rock-bottom price. The Massachusetts-based startup recently ran a successfully funded Kickstarter campaign and gained widespread attention only to run into a few roadblocks along the way. Now, with their setbacks behind them, Adapteva is slated to deliver its first units mid-December 2013, with volume shipping in the following months.

What makes the Parallella board so exciting is that it breaks new ground: imagine an Open Source Hardware board, powered by just a few Watts of juice, delivering 90 GFLOPS of number crunching. Combine this with the possibility of clustering multiple boards, and suddenly the picture of an exceedingly affordable desktop supercomputer emerges.

This review looks in-depth at a pre-release prototype board (so-called Generation Zero, a development run of 50 units), giving you a pretty complete overview of what the finished board will look like.

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